1. "I twittered about this earlier, but sometimes it feels as though talking about misogyny in this industry is like dealing with Groundhog Day: there seems to be a continuous reset, a collective male amnesia around the issue. As if, when a woman speaks out, it’s for the first time and everyone is shocked. Just shocked, I tell you. Sexism exists? OH MY GOD."
    — Veteran writer Marjorie Liu on sexual harassment/misogny in the comics industry—and the collective amnesia that hits much of the industry every time the topic ever gets broached. (via robot6)

    (via seananmcguire)

     

  2. "Irked fans produce fanfic like irritated oysters produce pearls."
    — 

    Jacqueline Lichtenberg in Fic by Anne Jamison (via treizquatorz)

    Love it.

    (via marybegone)

    OMG, the next fanfic gathering or workshop or blog should totally be called The Irritated Oyster.  I’m getting bunnies for the logo as I type. 

    (via drinkingcocoa-tpp)

    (via seananmcguire)

     

  3. Min Fami, Mythic Delirium 30, and Rhysling Nomination

    Min Fami, Mythic Delirium 30, and Rhysling Nomination

    So much poetry news!

    Min FamiI was delighted yesterday to receive my contributor copies of Min Fami: Arab Feminist Reflections on Identity, Space and Resistance, edited by Ghaida Moussa and Ghadeer Malek. I contributed two reprinted poems to the collection: “Pieces” and “Song for an Ancient City”, which originally appeared in Stone Telling and Mythic Deliriumrespectively. I’m very much looking forward to…

    View On WordPress

     
  4. princessnijireiki:

    In this Native-directed, -produced, and -starring movie, three contemporary, urban, indigenous sisters, Vickie (Valerie Red-Horse), Karen (Kimberly Norris Guerrero), and Tanya (Irene Bedard), face an uphill battle when they open their own business selling homegrown cosmetics under the name “Naturally Native,” encountering racist, patronizing attitudes along the way. Functioning as (director, writer, and actor) Red-Horse’s commentary on her fight with the movie industry to get Native-centered films, including her own, made, Naturally Native is the first film by, about, and fully financed by Native Americans, with all production monies being supplied by the Mashantucket Pequot Nation.

     
  5. THAT IS MY PHONE ON THE RIGHT THAT IS WHAT IT DOES ALSO ITS BATTERY LASTS A WEEK OK

    (Source: imgfave, via raniwasacyborg)

     
  6. d-pi:

    thehungryhungryemo:

    note-a-bear:

    qweent:

    Tulsa OK 1921: US Government Bombs US City


    National Guard troops patrolling the streets armed. Thousands of black people held in a convention center. Hundreds of black dead, with bodies piled like wood. That was not New Orleans, that was Tulsa, Oklahoma, in June 1921.

    On May 30, 1921 a young black man named Dick Rowland, stumbled into a white woman, while entering an elevator. He was accused of assault, and arrested the next day. Newly rich from oil Tulsa, was a Ku Klux Klan town. Rowland was sentenced to be hanged. The Tulsa Tribune called for a “Negro lynching tonight.”

    The white mob was surprised when they were met by several dozen armed black men, dressed in their World War I uniforms. This led to a racist three day destruction of the black neighborhood of Greenwood. The Red Cross reported 300 mostly dead black people.

    Greenwood called “Little Africa,” was a relatively wealthy community. White mobs, many deputized, destroyed every house, store, church or school. The mob met resistance from an armed black population. Governor Robertson declared martial law. The National Guard arrived with machine gun mounted trucks, and airplanes hovering over Greenwood. It was the first time an American city was bombed from the air, by the US government.

    Over 6,000 black people, were round up and held in the convention center and fairgrounds, as long as eight days. The homeless were shuttled into a tent city, where typhoid and malnutrition took over. Blacks were allowed out of the convention center, with a tag, with an employers name. Thosands fled the city.

    Attempts to turn Greenwood into an industrial zone were unsuccessful. For several years, it was deprived of paved streets, running water, and garbage collection.

    See: Tulsa Reparations Coalition and thank you to Internationalist Group for presenting this story in your newspaper.

    RENEGADE EYE

    [X]

    Always needs to be reblogged

    Shit they don’t teach you in school.

    (via moniquill)

     
  7. retrogradeworks:

    elizabethplaid:

    incognitomoustache:

    saintbucky:

    Anthony Mackie being the first black superhero (and making Bill O’Reilly uncomfortable) on Jimmy Fallon (x)

    I am so happy that Anthony Mackie is a person that exists.

    For anyone who’s going: “But what about Storm/Hancock/Frozone/War Machine etc etc?”: they’re referring to the fact that the character Falcon was the first African-American superhero* created (debuted in Captain America #177 in 1969). If you’ve watched the clip, you’ll notice that Mackie corrects Jimmy Fallon when he says first black superhero. This is because the first black superhero was Black Panther - debuted in Fantastic Four #52 in 1966 - whom lives in the fictive African country Wakanda, and is thus not a citizen of the USA.

    (* = the word “superhero” is usually not used for hero characters that pre-date Superman, nor actually very often used outside the mainstream comic book companies aka DC Comics and Marvel Comics. This is why such characters as The Phantom, created in 1936 aka 2 years before Superman, and whom wears spandex and a mask and punches evil guys in the face, is not generally dubbed a super hero. Anyway, the point of this asterisk is that I have no idea how many fictional, non-“super” hero characters there were of African decent before 1966)

    Reblogging for uncomfortable O’Reilly and awesome comic book information.

    This is absolutely magical.

    (via princessnijireiki)

     
  8. seananmcguire:

    knitmeapony:

    animalstalkinginallcaps:

    LOOK, WE KNOW YOU’RE RUNNING LATE AND THAT THIS IS PROBABLY WEIRD FOR YOU, BUT WE CAN’T LET YOU GO TO WORK IN THAT OUTFIT.

    WE CARE ABOUT YOU. 

    WE CONSIDER YOU A FRIEND, AND WE ONLY WANT WHAT’S BEST FOR YOU.

    Wrong type of cat, but this makes me think it’s what seananmcguire's house is like.

    …yeah basically.

     

  9. BEFORE BATGIRL, WEIRDER THAN WONDER WOMAN: LOST SUPERHEROINES OF THE PRE-CODE ERA

    saladinahmed:

    As I discussed in an earlier post, pre-Comics Code comic books are full of fascinating women superheroes who’ve been more or less forgotten in the decades since WWII. Born in the era of Rosie the Riveter, when there was a national campaign to get women into workplaces, these costumed heroines were brassy, hard-assed, snarky, and sometimes just plain weird. They displayed remarkable grit and independence, and were portrayed as better crime-fighters than the inept, sexist cops that got in their way.

    Even removed from their intriguing, important place in sociocultural history, these stories are compelling bits of pure comics nerdery - eg, the fact that 1941’s Spider Queen was almost certainly the unacknowledged inspiration for Spider-Man. These characters deserve to be better known. Happily, the astonishing www.digitalcomicmuseum.org hosts full-issue scans of scores of public domain pre-Code comics. Which means you can read these comics right now, for free!

    Here are a few of my favorite lost superheroines from the 1940s. Click on a character’s name to access an archive of their adventures!

    FANTOMAH - Arguably the first woman superhero, and to this day one of the strangest. Fantomah is a near-omniscient (blonde) jungle spirit with incredible magical/psionic powers. She is always threatening her enemies with “a jungle death!” and she turns into a green skull with beautiful hair when she’s angry.

    20140413-175401.jpg

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    LADY SATAN - Sometime Nazi-killer, sometime occult detective, Lady Satan roams the land in her stylish automobile, using gun, garrote, and fire magic to take out Reich agents and child-snatching werewolves.

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    MOTHER HUBBARD - Looking like a cartoon witch, speaking only in rhyme, Mother Hubbard uses her bizarre occult powers to battle everything from fifth column saboteurs to Disney-esque dwarves that steal kids’ eyeballs.

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    THE WOMAN IN RED - A gun-toting jujitsu expert, the Woman in Red is a sort of costumed private detective. She’s the bane of both criminals (especially those who prey on women) and inept male cops. But to the women she saves she’s quite…tender.

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    THE SPIDER QUEEN - A chemistry lab assistant becomes a wise-cracking costumed herowho uses wrist-strapped web shooters to swing around the city and tie up bad guys. But this is 1941, and our hero is a woman.

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    THE VEILED AVENGER - Although she’s the frilliest-looking of 40s superheroines, the Veiled Avenger might be the hardest. She uses her crop to make criminals shoot each other…and themselves. And in her civilian life as a District Attorney’s secretary, she scolds dumb cops who endanger witnesses.

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    Sadly, these heroines all disappeared by the 1950s. As the national project of getting women out of the workplace took hold, bold self-sufficient superheroines became scarce on the ground. Despite some great work by amazing artists over the years, comics still doesn’t have enough of them.

    [And now, a plug: I’m working on a longer piece on these heroines, and on some other stuff you might find interesting. You can learn more about all that here.]

    This looks really, REALLY cool.

     
  10. moniquill:

    tithenai:

    fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

    [image description: a set of eight lesbian pulp covers, all with ridiculously cheesy and dramatic covers and titles]

    OH HAI BOLAND CHECK THESE OUT

    That said I wonder how many of these were actually written by women. I presume the names aren’t much to go on.

    Casual reminder that basically all lesbian pulp novels end horribly because that was literally required back then.

    http://bibliodaze.com/2014/03/dead-lesbians-versus-none-at-all-a-brief-history-of-lesbian-pulp-fiction/

    That’s a fascinating article. This bit in particular:

    Women like Ann Bannon may have been bound by the conventions and expectations of the genre and the market, but several of these novels did manage to break beyond these expectations and produced more sympathetic portrayals of lesbianism in their pulp novels that lesbian readers could identify with. Ann Bannon’s Beebo Brinker novels offered a more pro-woman point-of-view than the novels explicitly intended for male readers, placing an emphasis on female love and desire, with lesbian sex described in highly romanticised terms, such as in this scene from I Am a Woman:

    “She felt like a column of fire, all heat and light, impossibly sensual, impossibly sexual. She was all feeling, warm and melting, strong and sweet (Page 390).”

    (Source: lockeslee)